Jacket for 'Peterloo. The Story of the Manchester Massacre'

Publishers

UK - Head of Zeus

Peterloo. The Story of the Manchester Massacre

By Jacqueline Riding

Published Oct 2018

 

 

Manchester, 16th August, 1819.

On a hot late summer’s day, a crowd of 60,000 gathered in St Peter’s Field. They came from all over Lancashire – ordinary working-class men, women and children – walking to the sound of hymns and holding silk banners aloft.  Their mood was happy, their purpose wholly serious: to demand fundamental reform of a corrupt electoral system.

By the end of the day fifteen people, including two women and a child, were dead of dying and 650 injured, hacked down by drunken yeomanry after local magistrates panicked at the size of the crowd.  Four years after defeating the ‘tyrant’ Bonaparte at Waterloo, the British state had turned its forces against its own people as they peaceably exercised their time-honoured liberties.  As well as describing the events of 16th August in shattering detail, Jacqueline Riding evokes the febrile state of England in the late 1810s, paints a memorable portrait of the reform movement and its charismatic leaders, and assesses the political legacy of the massacre to the present day.

As fast-paced and powerful as it is rigorously researched, Peterloo: The Story of the Manchester Massacre adds significantly to our understanding of a tragic staging-post on Britain’s journey to full democracy.

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